The humorist and previous “Full House” star coincidentally hit his head on something and afterward fell asleep, they said.

Weave Saget, the professional comic and entertainer known for playing Danny Leather treater on “Full House,” passed on from head injury after he inadvertently hit something, his family said in an assertion on Wednesday.

Mr Saget, 65, was tracked down inert on Jan. 9 in a lodging at the Ritz-Carlton Orlando, Grande Lake, and he was articulated dead at the scene, as per the Orange Province Sheriff’s Office.

“Since we have the last ends from the specialists’ examination, we felt it just legitimate that the fans hear those ends straightforwardly from us,” the family said. “They have reasoned that he coincidentally hit the rear of his head on something, barely cared about it and fell asleep. No medications or liquor were involved.”

The sheriff’s office said that after they tracked down Mr Saget there were no indications of unfairness.

The sheriff’s office alluded remark to the clinical analyst’s office, which didn’t promptly react to demands for input on Wednesday evening.

Mr Saget, who was on visit at that point, had performed on Jan. 8 at Ponte Vedra Show Lobby in Ponte Vedra Ocean side, Fla., southeast of Jacksonville. In a tweet right off the bat Jan. 9, he expressed gratitude toward the “thankful crowd.”

“In the weeks since Bounce’s passing, we have been overpowered with the extraordinary overflowing of adoration from Weave’s fans, which has been an incredible solace to us and for which we are forever appreciative,” his family said in its assertion. “As we keep on grieving together, we request that everybody recollect the affection and chuckling that Bounce brought to this world, and the illustrations he showed all of us: to be thoughtful to everybody, to let your loved ones realize you love them, and to confront troublesome times with embraces and giggling.”

In a post on Instagram denoting a month since Mr Saget’s passing, Kelly Rizzo, his widow, said he “really carried on with life to its fullest.”

“He had such countless difficulties throughout the long term that he would continuously tell me ‘look, living, all by itself, is a struggle, we want to appreciate it however much as could reasonably be expected,'” Ms. Rizzo composed.